• Leigh Gerstenberger

An Unsung Hero














When is a book more than a book?


Our nation has just observed Veterans Day for the 100th time.


Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on Nov. 11, 1919, the

first anniversary of the end of World War I.


In 1926 Congress passed a resolution for an annual observance

of what would come to be called Veterans day and November 11th

became a national holiday in 1938.


Unlike Memorial Day, Veterans Day pays tribute to all American

veterans—living or dead—but especially gives thanks to living

veterans who served their country honorably during war or

peacetime.


Over the years individuals and communities have observed

Veterans Day in large and small ways, from lavish parades to the

quiet placing of flags at the graves of men and women who have

made the ultimate sacrifice and given their lives in service to our

country.


But there have also been countless personal and private tributes

to the fallen that often go unreported or unrecognized outside of a

small group of individuals knowledgeable of the circumstances

around a veteran’s life.


One of those personal tributes is the subject of this week’s book

recommendation.


Ross Greene’s uncle, 2nd Lieutenant Ross W. (Bud) Perrin, Jr.

lost his life in a bombing mission during World War II. Perrin left

behind a widow and a daughter, born just days after he was shot

down.


As a tribute to his uncle and as an act of love to his cousin who

never knew her father, Greene spent seven years and made a

considerable financial investment to introduce his cousin to the

father she never knew.


Greene’s tribute to his late uncle involved reviewing over a

thousand letters between his uncle and aunt during the time he

served our country. Additionally, Greene was able to do

extensive interviews with individuals who served with his uncle

and others who knew him during his formative years.


The result is a journey back in time that that profiles the inspiring

story of one of our country’s unsung heroes.


When is a book more than a book? When it is an act of love.

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